FAQs

  • A renewable energy standard simply requires that a minimum percentage of energy comes from clean, renewable sources like wind and solar.  
  • Thirty other states, including Illinois, Minnesota and Iowa, have already successfully adopted measures similar to this initiative.
  • Michigan currently gets just 3.9 percent of its electricity from renewable sources. (Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration)
  • Meanwhile, other states are far ahead, including Iowa, whose renewable energy use is at 23 percent, and Illinois, whose 25-percent-by-2025 goal is saving businesses and families there $176 million, according to the Illinois Power Agency.
  • Michigan currently gets 58 percent of its electricity from coal, all of which is imported from other states. Michigan sends $1.7 billion a year -- and the jobs they create -- to other states. (Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration)
  • The broad and bipartisan Michigan Energy Michigan Jobs coalition includes Michigan businesses, health professionals, labor organizations, faith leaders, environmental and conservation groups and more.  
  • No.
  • The Michigan Public Service Commission, the Illinois Power Agency, the Wisconsin Public Utilities Commission, Synapse and others have all reported that renewable energy helps bring down costs.
  • In fact, MPSC reports show that when they ask to increase rates, utilities cite as the main reason the increasing cost of fuel used to transport coal into Michigan, which is 71 percent MORE expensive today than in 2006.
  • Yes.
  • Michigan’s current renewable energy standard is 10 percent by 2015, which was signed into law in 2008.
  • Michigan's utility companies are on track to meet the 10 percent standard.
  • Michigan is getting left behind.
  • More than 30 other states have measures similar to Proposal 3. 
  • Our Midwest neighbors Minnesota, Illinois, Iowa and Ohio have 25 by 2025 renewable energy standards and they're attracting jobs and reducing energy costs.
  • Transitioning to clean, renewable energy won't happen overnight. Each unit of coal that is replaced by renewable energy will make our air cleaner.
  • It's important to diversify our energy mix to reduce our dependence on imported coal and foreign oil, strengthening Michigan's energy economy and keeping our money and jobs in Michigan.
  • The Michigan Public Service Commission stated in February that all renewable energy is about $58 per megawatt/hour cheaper than new coal generation.
  • Just as advances in technology have brought down the price of things like flat-screen TVs and computers, they have also brought down the cost of renewable energy.
  • The cost of wind-generated electricity is on par with the cost of electricity from natural gas and contracts can be fixed price for 20-25 years, whereas natural gas prices are volatile. 
  • Yes, and more.
  • To meet 25 by 2025, Michigan needs to build only 4,600 megawatts of electricity generation capacity from renewable energy.
  • Michigan has more than 54,000 megawatts of high-quality, land-based wind generation potential, according to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. That's nearly 12 times more than needed to meet 25 by 2025, meaning we need to harness only 8 percent of available land-based wind.
  • Michigan can meet 25 by 2025 using wind alone on around 4,600 acres of land.
  • Michigan also has more sunny days than Germany, one of the world's leading producers of solar energy.
  • Yes.
  • New technology and innovations are making renewable energy more affordable and more reliable.
  • Hawaii, North and South Dakota, Iowa, Colorado and California all get more than 20 percent of electricity from renewable energy and have electric reliability as good as or better than Michigan.
  • Increasing our use of renewable energy and energy efficiency will give us cleaner and healthier air and water, protect our Great Lakes, reduce illness, and ultimately save lives.
  • The dirty coal plants that provide 58 percent of Michigan's electricity emit dangerous levels of mercury, sulfur dioxide and arsenic, which are linked to heart diseases, childhood asthma, lung diseases and premature death.
  • That’s why doctors, nurses, scientists and other health advocates support increasing Michigan’s use of renewable energy and energy efficiency.
  • Increasing Michigan's use of renewable energy will help farmers throughout Michigan by allowing them to lease out portions of their land for wind farms, better preserve farmlands and attract development to rural areas.
  • Agriculture is one of Michigan's largest industries, and increasing Michigan's use of renewable energy will help strengthen it and create jobs for Michigan workers.
  • Furthermore, renewable energy protects our water, air and land for future generations of farmers.

Clean Energy Facts

  • Renewable energy currently accounts for just 3.6 percent of the energy used in Michigan. As a comparison, Iowa already gets 23 percent of its electricity from renewables. (Source: Energy Information Administration)
  • Coal makes up 58 percent of Michigan’s energy mix, despite the fact the state has no coal reserves. (Source:U.S. Energy Information Administration)
  • Michigan consumers spend more than $1.7 billion a year importing coal from other states. (Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration)
  • Nearly 30 states have stronger renewable energy standard and energy efficiency standards than Michigan’s current RES of 10 percent without significant increases in utility costs for consumers. (Source: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
  • Clean energy is a growing market and this proposal will help make sure that Michigan is a leader in these new technologies. It will create good jobs now and in the future, start new businesses, and stimulate economic development right here in Michigan. Recent studies estimate that an initiative like this will create tens of thousands of new Michigan jobs that can’t be outsourced. (Source: U. N. Report June 2012 & National Renewable Energy Laboratory)
  • Using more wind and solar energy will reduce pollution and give Michigan cleaner and healthier air and water, protect the Great Lakes, reduce asthma and lung disease, and ultimately save lives. (Source: CERES article)
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